"Friends of Lakota"

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"Friends of Lakota"

"Friends of Lakota" is a collaborative gathering artistically sculpting and designing a new circle of learning committed to peace in unity between Ancient Oral Native Life Ways (indigenous peoples connected to the land~earth) and the at large massive perspectives that have arisen in civilization currently controlling systemic patterns and flows in human ecological conditional situation.  We believe there is a way to find a new balance, wholeness and maturity in the future in questioning, a quest for the wholeness in the hunger of our shared human heart. 

We see the possibility of a mutual liberation through our living caring voices that share authentic permanent heart felt human concerns in the breakdowns arising in our daily lives as an opportunity to breakthrough and design a future world together benefiting our virtual identities, our communities, all peoples and the beauty in the web of life we all love.  

We offer a new notion of a "Clearing for Learning" that begins by suspending what we know, our certainties of what is happening, owning authentically what current owns us, and exploring unknown landscapes and territories disclosing new worlds in living languages through deep appreciated speech acts in open inquiry and dialog. 

We propose to break open the heart of being Homo sapiens amans ~ loving wise~sing up social beings in a new pattern of dignified social interactions as a mutual liberated learning of our kinship within the interior splace of the human heart.

We are an imaginal circle operating in open appreciative inquiry and dialog for both indigenous peoples and leading edge ecological awareness committing to collaborate and design a future world together valuing the deep shared roots of our humanness as dignified contributors to a new discourse bringing forth institutional changes for sustainability caring for future generations, children of tomorrow. 

You are invited to participate in this leadingship learning experience, organizing, designing, and formulating specific break outs into domains of inquiry dreaming of possible possibilities in the wonder of mutual liberation in dignity for the web of all life on earth.

We are common ordinary people with no authoritarian claims, rank, titles, positions or publications in our reflective growing aspirations, yet honor roles and processes in social organizations.  The Lakota people are an ancient unit of our humanity over 10,000 years old and are offering a spectacular clearing for learning in 2012! 

The Lakota history has intersected in the last 150 years the injustice, marginalization, inequality and inter-generational trauma produced by the social political and economic patterns and flows worldwide in the Discovery Doctrine that has operated in western civilization since 1492.  Our quest in a manner of Wolakota, a treaty of peace and friendship without greed, is to end the poverty cycle in human affairs.  In a courageous manner, the Lakota still know love as the inclusive sustainability in the ancient wisdom continuum of adorning one another in human dignity as a joyful concern embedded in an ancient ancestral praxis of living in realization.

Our perspective is that every indigenous language is an ancient, wise repository for our own humanness as Homo sapiens amans today that is biologically awakening to knowing love in liberated social interactions in our humanity as a whole.

Let us, together, begin to learn and work at designing a new future.  Thank you for your attention in this regard and if I can be of service in any of your reflections please feel free to respond in public or privately,

Best regards always,

Mushin

Website: http://makasitomni.ning.com/
Location: Global
Members: 12
Latest Activity: Oct 23, 2012

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Comment by Bruce Schuman on September 4, 2012 at 8:58pm

Over on Tom Atlee's "Transformational Thinkpad", I'm starting to think about some kind of "holistic framework" that could contain the elements of the new kind of democracy that many of us are looking for.  Tom has put together a pretty good starting point for a discussion like this in his new book Empowering Public Wisdom http://empoweringpublicwisdom.us/

I wrote to Tom and mentioned that for me, this new democracy/politics must in some appropriate and powerful way be held together not only in "wholeness" -- but in spirit, in oneness.  He wrote me back, saying that he himself was not going to put spirit at the center of his model -- but that I was invited to post something into his conversation that took this perspective.

That conversation is just starting to move a bit -- and it feels to me like what I want to do -- is offer what essentially amounts to a circle-based approach, that holds political unity together as "community", and anchors even secular/civic decisions in a framework that might not always be directly considered "sacred" -- but which could be consistently resonant with the sacred -- much as it is defined in the sacred circle processes that Phil Lane is talking about -- and which I generally see as the core baseline of traditional/classical First Nations spirituality.

For me -- the big picture -- the "macro-container" -- is the relationship of "the many and the one" -- as expressed in the old USA motto "E Pluribus Unum".

A quote I find quite profound on this theme is

"Let us contemplate the one simple nature of that peaceful unity which joins all things to itself and to each other, preserving them in their distinctiveness and yet linking them together in a universal and unconfused alliance."   (Pseudo-Dionysius, The Complete Works - John Farina, Editor-in-Chief 
Many Voices / One Truth / Spirit of the World )

Guided by this quote -- I'd like to see a simple but profound interpretation of the indigenous "hoop of the nation" model emerge as the foundational framework for a transformed politics of the people.

Tom's conversation is "We need to reformulate political power now"

http://tom-atlee.posterous.com/we-need-to-reformulate-political-pow...

"The individual is going to be universalized, the universal is going to be individualized, and thus from both directions the whole is going to be enriched."

- Jan Smuts, Holism and Evolution, frontispiece for The Open Collaboration Encyclopedia

http://www.pioneerimprints.com/Pioneer/Open_Collaboration_Freemium....

Thanks Stephanie -- I saw your reviews on Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A1C4J8NZ2Q1RCP/ref=cm_cr_dp_pdp

Comment by David Eggleton on September 4, 2012 at 12:46pm

I stumble on the words world and global, reflexively suspecting the user of a planetary design/scheme that may be brilliant and will not advance.  While recognizing natural global interconnectedness, I haven't attention, time or energy for such (hidden) agendas.

I quickly recover and my interest grows when I read "adorning one another in human dignity as a joyful concern embedded in an ancient ancestral praxis of living in realization."

Comment by Stephanie Nestlerode on September 3, 2012 at 8:15pm

thanks Bruce for these links!  awesome ...

Phil Lane is inspiring .. and I would imagine that most indians if not all would embrace his worldview

In my experience, complexity arises based not on philosophy but around politics.  Indians have large variation when it comes to relating to the dominant culture.  Many have objected to sharing native wisdoms with non-natives.  Others believe it's imperative.  They also vary tremendously on whether or to what degree they apply native wisdom to their tribal governance.  Harvard has shown that tribes who do use ancient wisdom have better results.  They concluded that all tribes would be wise to do so.  From my perspective any governing body would benefit!

As a result, I make no assumptions about what the Lakota would find helpful or a path forward to bridging cultures.  I am curious to find out!

Comment by Bruce Schuman on September 3, 2012 at 1:04pm

And to respond to Stephanie's question -- is there any significant difference between a Lokota perspective -- and, say, the perspective offered by Hereditary Chief Phil Lane from the Ihanktowan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations?

Here is the text of a great speech from Phil Lane, speaking to the 3rd Annual International Indigenous Leaders Gathering focused on the theme “Protecting the Sacred.” It was held in Lillooet, British Columbia, May 30-June 5, 2011.

http://theinterfaithobserver.org/journal-articles/2012/4/12/protect...

From my point of view, much of the indigenous wisdom, particularly involving circles, is universal.  Black Elk was Lakota -- his statement that "The hoop of the nation is broken" is a call to the wholeness of circle -- a call that is strongly reinforced in the broad statement of principles that govern Phil Lane's work.

"Starting from within, working in a circle, in a sacred manner, we develop and heal ourselves, our relationships, and the world."

http://networkofcircles.net/docs/DeepSocialNetworks.pdf

This vision is strongly resonant with Mushin's remark

We are an imaginal circle operating in open appreciative inquiry and dialog for both indigenous peoples and leading edge ecological awareness committing to collaborate and design a future world together valuing the deep shared roots of our humanness as dignified contributors to a new discourse bringing forth institutional changes for sustainability caring for future generations, children of tomorrow. 

http://www.unitedindians.org/publications_articles001.html

Comment by Stephanie Nestlerode on September 3, 2012 at 12:27pm

Mushin,

all of our futures are interdependent and there is much ancient wisdom to apply to the task of making wise choices.  From a Lakota perspective, how can they imagine us bridging our futures together in a positive direction?

Comment by Bruce Schuman on September 1, 2012 at 8:03pm

Here is a related article recently posted to Phil Lane's site:

2012 -- Top Ten Trends Towards A Golden Age & A Wisdom Based Global Economy -- Beyond The Global Financial Crisis

http://www.fwii.net/profiles/blogs/2012-top-ten-trends-towards-a-go...

Comment by Bruce Schuman on September 1, 2012 at 7:55pm

I admire -- and follow -- the indigenous circle vision developed by First Nations Chief Phil Lane, Jr and Jon Ramer.   Phil Lane's site is http://www.fwii.net/   

Their vision:

Deep Social Networks and the Digital Fourth Way

"Starting from within, working in a circle, in a sacred manner, we develop and heal ourselves, our relationships, and the world."

http://networkofcircles.net/docs/DeepSocialNetworks.pdf

 

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